From Dawn till Dusk - Val d'Orcia

"Oh, Sunlight! The most precious gold to be found on Earth."

― Roman Payne

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY 55mm Ƒ/1.8 @ Ƒ/14 • 1.3 sec • ISO 100

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY 55mm Ƒ/1.8 @ Ƒ/14 • 1.3 sec • ISO 100

As photographers, every journey we take has a common feature, a highlight marked with capital letters in our agenda: SUNRISE and SUNSET.

We simply cannot help avoiding to get up early in the morning, grab the camera and go out in the wild; or skip the first course of dinner because we need to catch the last ray of light vanishing behind the hills. It is in our blood; it is something we simply cannot control.

Tuscany and especially the Val d'Orcia land are the perfect places to satisfy our need for sunlight. Here, in between these gentle hills, lie some of the best spots for sunrise and sunsets in the world. We are presenting to you some of our favourite spots, and also, reveal secrets on how to take the shot of a lifetime. Ready to follow the sun?

Grain fields at sunrise  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Nikon D750 • AF-S Micro NIKKOR 105 mm Ƒ/2.8 ED IF VR @ Ƒ/5.6 • 1/4000 sec • ISO 100

Grain fields at sunrise
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Nikon D750 • AF-S Micro NIKKOR 105 mm Ƒ/2.8 ED IF VR @ Ƒ/5.6 • 1/4000 sec • ISO 100

Locations

Let us say it out loud before everything else: if you are in Val d'Orcia, basically every hill is good for sunset and sunrise; this is undeniable. Due to how this land and geographically is formed: there are no particular high spots. However, there is a wave of rolling hills, almost of the same height, stretching as far as the eye can see. So be prepared, because the sun you are looking for may be just around the corner or over the top of the next ridge.

Even in Val d'Orcia, not all spots are created equal. This is why we want to present you the spots we consider the best of the best.

Sunrise at Podere Belvedere Valley  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Nikon D750 • NIKKOR 70-210 Ƒ/4-5.6 @ 170mm • Ƒ/11 • 1/40 sec • ISO 100

Sunrise at Podere Belvedere Valley
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Nikon D750 • NIKKOR 70-210 Ƒ/4-5.6 @ 170mm • Ƒ/11 • 1/40 sec • ISO 100

Cypress trees in a foggy morning in val d’Orcia  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 24MM • Ƒ/20 • 1/80 sec • ISO 100

Cypress trees in a foggy morning in val d’Orcia
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 24MM • Ƒ/20 • 1/80 sec • ISO 100

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY 55mm Ƒ/1.8 @ Ƒ/11 • 1.3 sec • ISO 100

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY 55mm Ƒ/1.8 @ Ƒ/11 • 1.3 sec • ISO 100

Now we know where to go. But what about how to catch the sun? What are the secrets? What gear is best for this kind of photography? Here is a list you definitely have to follow to improve your skills

Gear

Flashlight

Don't be left in the dark! A headlamp or flashlight is useful for making sure you can see your surroundings and navigate the path before the sun rises, or stop you from falling over once it has set. There are no street lights out here, so if the moon is not out, and you are left without a lamp, you might end up down the bottom of the hill quicker than you intended.

Lenses

The rule is simple: if you want the sun to look large in the sunset or sunrise, use a telephoto. Otherwise, if your aim is to see the sun smaller in the scene, use a wide-angle lens. Simple.

And never forget to clean your sensor first and your lenses first! Dust spots are amplified when shooting into the sun, and it could ruin all the work you have done.

Sunrise at Podere Belvedere Valley  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 70-200mm Ƒ/4 G OSS @ 200MM • Ƒ/11 • 1/125 sec • ISO 400

Sunrise at Podere Belvedere Valley
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 70-200mm Ƒ/4 G OSS @ 200MM • Ƒ/11 • 1/125 sec • ISO 400

Tripod

A must-have when you are shooting the twilight periods. Not only will it give you the ability to lock in the perfect composition, but it allows you to shoot a smaller aperture to maximise the depth of field, and shoot the lowest ISO possible for the cleanest and crispest image. But, in doing so, if often requires slower shutter speeds that can't be obtained handheld.

Flash

Bring along a Speedlight with you if you're planning on shooting a portrait of someone standing in front of a sunset or if you want to illuminate foreground objects. It is the only way to have both well exposed.

Sunrise at Podere Belvedere valley  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 55mm Ƒ/4 ZA @ Ƒ/11 • 1.3 sec • ISO 100

Sunrise at Podere Belvedere valley
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 55mm Ƒ/4 ZA @ Ƒ/11 • 1.3 sec • ISO 100

General Tips

Arrive early and leave late

It's the first commandment, the main rule. If you arrive 60 minutes before dawn and dusk, besides having the chance to get incredible results with long-exposures, you have all the time to find the perfect compositions, prepare your gear and have a coffee to wake up if you need one!

Don't rush to pack your bags. Usually, the best light is just moments either side of the actual sunrise and sunset. We typically break down the time into three segments. The time before the sun rises, and after it sets is "blue hour" where there is residual light in the sky, but the sun is not present. "Sunrise and Sunset" mark the start of the end of "Goldern hour" where the shadows are deep, and the quality of light takes on a virtuous goldern hue.

Field in a foggy morning  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 24MM • Ƒ/22 • 1/100 sec • ISO 100

Field in a foggy morning
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 24MM • Ƒ/22 • 1/100 sec • ISO 100

Underexpose

This is an essential tip for taking pictures of sunsets. Slightly underexposing the sunset will make the colours look more vibrant and defined. The entire scene will become more dramatic. It is obviously a matter of style, but if you try darker you'll never come back!

Foreground

The best recipe for a good sunset is to have some object of interest in the foreground. If you're in Val d'Orcia, spikes and flowers are right there for this purpose. They will add depth to the scene and make your photo stunning.

Sunset in Val d’Orcia  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 12MM • Ƒ/13 • 1/125 sec • ISO 200

Sunset in Val d’Orcia
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 12MM • Ƒ/13 • 1/125 sec • ISO 200

Silhouettes

Just speed up your shutter speed, and you'll have a silhouette. The key to taking a good silhouette shot is to find a subject with fine details that will let the sun shine through it and that has a recognisable shape.

Wildflowers at sunrise  PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Nikon D750 • AF-S Micro NIKKOR 105mm Ƒ/2.8 ED IF VR @ Ƒ/5.6 • 1/4000 sec • ISO 100

Wildflowers at sunrise
PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Nikon D750 • AF-S Micro NIKKOR 105mm Ƒ/2.8 ED IF VR @ Ƒ/5.6 • 1/4000 sec • ISO 100

Take off your sunglasses

It may seem obvious, but how many times does it happen? With sunglasses on, you'll think the photos are all darker than they really are because the LCD will look unnaturally dark. If you forget, you'll kick yourself when you look at the photos back at home. If in doubt, remember to look at your histogram as it always has a mathematical representation of the data recorded.

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 24MM • Ƒ/9 • 1/250 sec • ISO 100

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIRKO FIN • Sony Alpha 7R MkIII • SONY FE 12-24MM Ƒ/4 G @ 24MM • Ƒ/9 • 1/250 sec • ISO 100

And these are just some of the many reasons we are excited to host a seven-day intensive workshop in Tuscany in May 2020. Care to join us? Learn more on our Tuscany Photography Workshop page.


Author: Mirko Fin

Mirko has no limits or disciplines in photography; he looks for the meaning in everything. He finds his life as a photographer as a never-ending challenge, an everlasting expedition. He is hosting our seven-day intensive Tuscany Photography Workshop in May 2020. Places are limited, so act quickly if you want to be a part of this photographic journey.